1992 Chevrolet Lumina Minivan Insurance Quotes – 10 Policy Discounts

Trying to find lower insurance rates for your Chevrolet Lumina Minivan? Did a good deal turn out to be overpriced insurance? Don’t feel bad because there are many consumers feeling the pinch from expensive insurance. Due to the fact that there are so many insurance companies to choose from, it can be hard to choose the lowest price insurance company.

The best way to get policy rate comparisons is to know most of the bigger providers will pay a fee to give you rate quotes. The one thing you need to do is spend a couple of minutes providing details such as whether you drive to work or school, which vehicles you own, if you require a SR-22, and how old drivers are. The data is then sent to multiple insurance coverage providers and they return cost estimate almost instantly.

To start a quote now, click here and complete the form.

What insurance coverages do I need?

When choosing the best car insurance coverage, there really is no “best” method to buy coverage. Every insured’s situation is different and your policy should reflect that. Here are some questions about coverages that might help in determining if your situation may require specific advice.

  • What exactly is covered by my policy?
  • What are the best liability limits?
  • I have a DUI can I still get coverage?
  • Is my camper covered by my car insurance policy?
  • Are all vehicle passengers covered by medical payments coverage?
  • What is UM/UIM insurance?
  • What can I do if my company won’t pay a claim?

If it’s difficult to answer those questions, then you may want to think about talking to a licensed agent. If you don’t have a local agent, take a second and complete this form or you can also visit this page to select a carrier It’s fast, free and can provide invaluable advice.

Specific coverages for a 1992 Chevy Lumina Minivan

Having a good grasp of insurance aids in choosing the right coverages and proper limits and deductibles. Insurance terms can be ambiguous and even agents have difficulty translating policy wording. Shown next are the normal coverages found on the average insurance policy.

Comprehensive auto coverage – Comprehensive insurance coverage pays to fix your vehicle from damage from a wide range of events other than collision. You first have to pay a deductible then your comprehensive coverage will pay.

Comprehensive coverage pays for things such as damage from getting keyed, falling objects and hitting a bird. The maximum payout your insurance company will pay is the cash value of the vehicle, so if the vehicle’s value is low consider removing comprehensive coverage.

Medical payments and PIP coverage – Med pay and PIP coverage kick in for expenses for things like dental work, ambulance fees, surgery, hospital visits and X-ray expenses. They are used to cover expenses not covered by your health insurance policy or if there is no health insurance coverage. Coverage applies to you and your occupants in addition to being hit by a car walking across the street. Personal injury protection coverage is not available in all states but can be used in place of medical payments coverage

Collision – This pays to fix your vehicle from damage resulting from a collision with a stationary object or other vehicle. You first must pay a deductible and then insurance will cover the remainder.

Collision insurance covers things like rolling your car, hitting a mailbox, driving through your garage door and hitting a parking meter. Collision is rather expensive coverage, so consider removing coverage from older vehicles. It’s also possible to bump up the deductible to bring the cost down.

UM/UIM (Uninsured/Underinsured Motorist) coverage – This protects you and your vehicle’s occupants when the “other guys” either have no liability insurance or not enough. Covered losses include hospital bills for your injuries and damage to your Chevy Lumina Minivan.

Due to the fact that many drivers only carry the minimum required liability limits, it doesn’t take a major accident to exceed their coverage limits. For this reason, having high UM/UIM coverages should not be overlooked.

Auto liability – This will cover injuries or damage you cause to a person or their property by causing an accident. Liability coverage has three limits: per person bodily injury, per accident bodily injury, and a property damage limit. You might see liability limits of 50/100/50 that translate to a $50,000 limit per person for injuries, a total of $100,000 of bodily injury coverage per accident, and $50,000 of coverage for damaged propery.

Liability coverage pays for things like pain and suffering, funeral expenses, bail bonds and repair costs for stationary objects. The amount of liability coverage you purchase is up to you, but it’s cheap coverage so purchase as high a limit as you can afford.